Milestones at month 1 & 2

As you learn what milestones your baby is likely to achieve this year, keep in mind that this is only a guideline. Each child is unique and develops at her own pace. There’s a wide range of what’s considered normal, and you probably don’t need to be concerned unless you notice one of the red flags described below.

Developmental milestones at 1 month

The first days with your 1-month-old can be a blur of feeding, changing diapers, settling her to sleep, and responding to her wails. But within a few weeks, she’ll start to take more notice of your voice, face, and touch.

Your baby can’t focus farther than 8 to 12 inches away – just the right distance for her to gaze at your face. Black-and-white patterns also draw her attention. Her hearing is fully developed and she might turn toward familiar sounds, such as your voice.

She can lift her head briefly and turn it to the side when she’s on her stomach, but when she’s upright her head and neck still need support. Although her arms move jerkily, she can get her hands close to her mouth.

Bonding with your baby (Advice from moms)

Your role

• Enjoy getting to know your baby: Cuddle her, talk to her, and learn how she signals when she’s sleepy or hungry. Be attentive and responsive. You can’t spoil a baby!

• Give her plenty of tummy time from the start when she’s awake so she can strengthen her muscles. Encourage her to look at and reach for toys.

• Make sure she gets plenty of time outside. Go for walks with her and take her to the park or playground. She’ll enjoy the outdoors, relaxing with you, and being around other children.

• Get close and make eye contact with your baby when you talk, sing, and read to her.

• Play simple games when she’s alert and in the mood, such as peekaboo or mimicking her sounds.

• Learn the signs that she’s had enough play and needs some down time.

Red flags

Each child develops at her own pace, but talk to your baby’s doctor if your 1-month-old:

• Feeds slowly or doesn’t suck well

• Doesn’t seem to focus her eyes or watch things moving nearby

• Doesn’t react to bright lights

• Seems especially stiff or floppy

• Doesn’t respond to loud sounds.

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